powershell automation

Azure – Generate report for unattached Azure disks (managed and un-managed)

When you delete a virtual machine (VM) in Azure, by default, any disks that are attached to the VM aren’t deleted. This feature helps to prevent data loss due to the unintentional deletion of VMs. After a VM is deleted, you will continue to pay for unattached disks.

Unattached MANAGED disks:

When a managed disk is attached to a VM, the ManagedBy property contains the resource ID of the VM. When a managed disk is unattached, the ManagedBy property is null. The script examines all the managed disks in an Azure subscription. When the script locates a managed disk with the ManagedBy property set to null, the script determines that the disk is unattached.

Unattached UN-MANAGED disks:

When an unmanaged disk is attached to a VM, the LeaseStatus property is set to Locked. When an unmanaged disk is unattached, the LeaseStatus property is set to Unlocked. The script examines all the unmanaged disks in all the Azure storage accounts in an Azure subscription. When the script locates an unmanaged disk with a LeaseStatus property set to Unlocked, the script determines that the disk is unattached.

SCRIPT:

Download the script here

PowerShell script to generate a report of unattached VHD disks. This script will create two files – unattached_managed_disks.csv, unattached_un_managed_disks.csv

These two files will contain details about VHD files that are not attached to an Azure virtual machine.

NOTE: You have to login into your account before running the script. “login-azurermaccount” to log in to your account.

You can use the generated CSV to better manage your Azure infrastructure. Understand why the disks are not in use and take an informed decision on whether you want to delete or re-use them. Thus helping you to identify resources that are not being utilized and to reduce cost.

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Azure – Server Inventory solution

This blog post is dedicated to IT Operations team and administrators who are managing Cloud Infrastructure. The recommended practice while providing managed service to any client is to have a CMDB (Configuration Management Database), which tracks the list of servers and the corresponding details, that we are managing for the client.

However, considering the dynamic nature of the cloud environment, it is a difficult task to maintain such a database. Manually updating the list of servers/server inventory is tedious and error-prone. The only solution is to have an automated approach to this problem.

Below is my solution:

The PowerShell script will extract virtual machines and their details. In this particular case, the script will consider virtual machines, which has tags (‘owner’,’Manju’). That is, I want to manage virtual machines owned only by me. You can go ahead and make changes to the script if you have a different requirement.

Next, the script will write the data into an Azure table. Remember, that the Azure table has to be created before running the script. Another option is Azure Cosmos DB.

Next, you can upload this script to your Azure Automation account or a dedicated windows server. Then, schedule this script to run every one hour to track your server inventory.

The script uses cmdlets from the “AzureRmStorageTable” PowerShell module.

Execute “Install-Module AzureRmStorageTable” to install the module.

Note: You have to alter the script when you schedule the script. The login mechanism is different for “Azure Automation” and “Task scheduler via Windows server”. The login mechanism of the below script is to execute it directly (manually) from PowerShell console or PowerShell ISE.

 

Script:

# Author: Manjunath Rao
# Date: Febuary 13, 2018

# Install-Module AzureRmStorageTable –>> THIS MODULE NEEDED

# Login to Azure
Login-AzureRmAccount
## Code to create Azure table storage context
$azure_table_storage_account_name = “xxx”
$azure_table_name = “xxx”
$azure_table_partitionKey = “xxx”
$azure_table_rowkey = “xxx”

$azure_table_resource_group = “xxx”

$storage_account_context = (Get-AzureRmStorageAccount -ResourceGroupName $azure_table_resource_group -Name $azure_table_storage_account_name).Context

$azure_table_object = Get-AzureStorageTable -Name $azure_table_name -Context $storage_account_context

############################################

# Getting all the resource group
$resource_group_list = Get-AzureRmResourceGroup

# Iterating through the resource group
foreach($resource_group_list_iterator in $resource_group_list){

# Since the solution applies for virtual machines,
# obtain the list of virtual machines for the resource group
$virtual_machine_list = get-azurermvm -ResourceGroupName $resource_group_list_iterator.ResourceGroupName

# Proceed only when resource group contains virtual machines
if(!($virtual_machine_list -eq $null)){

# Iterate through the virtual machine list
foreach($virtual_machine_list_iterator in $virtual_machine_list){

# Creat an unique ID by concatinating ‘Resource Group name’ and ‘Virtual Machine name’
$unique_id = $resource_group_list_iterator.ResourceGroupName + $virtual_machine_list_iterator.name
#Write-Host $unique_id
$tag_list = $virtual_machine_list_iterator.Tags

$tag_list.GetEnumerator() | foreach {
#write-host $_.key
#Write-Host $_.value
#write-host “”

$partitionKey1 = $unique_id

if($_.key -eq ‘owner’ -and $_.value -eq ‘manju’) {
#write-host “true”
$virtual_machine_name = $virtual_machine_list_iterator.Name.ToString()
$virtual_machine_resource_group_name = $resource_group_list_iterator.ResourceGroupName.ToString()
$virtual_machine_location = $virtual_machine_list_iterator.Location.ToString()
$virtual_machine_size = $virtual_machine_list_iterator.HardwareProfile.VmSize.ToString()
$virtual_machine_operating_system = $virtual_machine_list_iterator.StorageProfile.ImageReference.Offer.ToString()

 

$hash = @{}
#$hash.add(‘currentDate’, $current_date)
$hash.Add(‘VMName’,$virtual_machine_resource_group_name)
$hash.Add(‘ResourceGroup’,$virtual_machine_resource_group_name)
$hash.add(‘Location’,$virtual_machine_location)
$hash.add(‘VMSize’,$virtual_machine_size)
$hash.add(‘OperatingSystem’,$virtual_machine_operating_system)

# Write data into azure table
Add-StorageTableRow -table $azure_table_object -partitionKey (“CA1”) -rowKey ([guid]::NewGuid().tostring()) -property $hash

}
}

}

}

}

 

On the other hand, if you would like to fetch inventory details, and just save it in an excel sheet, I have the perfect scripts that do the job for you:

https://manjunathrao.com/2017/12/04/powershell-generte-azure-paas-inventory/

https://manjunathrao.com/2016/12/30/powershell-generate-azure-inventory/

https://manjunathrao.com/2017/04/06/powershell-generate-aws-inventory/

 

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