Azure

Azure – Collecting performance metrics for Azure virtual machines

Azure Monitor provides several ways to interact with metrics, including charting them in the portal, accessing them through the REST API, or querying them using PowerShell or CLI.

In this blog, we shall learn how to fetch the metrics for our Azure Virtual Machines using PowerShell. The script that I provide can be used as a utility to generate quick reports.

Below is the script:

 

<#
AUTHOR:
Manjunath Rao
DATE:
February 21, 2018
DESCRIPTION:
The script will generate performance metrics (as recorded by Azure agent) from Azure virtual machines and then populate into an excel sheet.
REFERENCE:
https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/azure/monitoring-and-diagnostics/monitoring-supported-metrics
#>
$ErrorActionPreference = “SilentlyContinue”
# Login to Azure Account
try
{
Login-AzureRmAccount -ErrorAction Stop
}
catch
{
# The exception lands in [Microsoft.Azure.Commands.Common.Authentication.AadAuthenticationCanceledException]
Write-Host “User Cancelled The Authentication” -ForegroundColor Yellow
exit
}
# Prompting the user to select the subscription
Get-AzureRmSubscription | Out-GridView -OutputMode Single -Title “Please select a subscription” | ForEach-Object {$selectedSubscriptionID = $PSItem.SubscriptionId}
Write-Host “You have selected the subscription: $selectedSubscriptionID. Proceeding with fetching the inventory. `n” -ForegroundColor green
# Setting the selected subscription
Select-AzureRmSubscription -SubscriptionId $selectedSubscriptionID
# Get the list of resource groups
$resourcegroup_list = (get-azurermresourcegroup).resourcegroupname
try{
# Create an Excel COM Object
$excel = New-Object -ComObject excel.application
}catch{
Write-Host “Something went wrong in creating excel. Make sure you have MSOffice installed to access MSExcel. Please try running the script again. `n” -ForegroundColor Yellow
}
# Create a Workbook
$workbook = $excel.Workbooks.Add()
# Creating a directory overrides if any directory exists with the same name
Write-Host “Creating a directory: C:\AzurePerformanceMetrics. This operation will override if you have a directory with the same name. `n” -ForegroundColor Yellow
New-Item C:\AzurePerformanceMetrics -Type Directory -Force
Write-Host “Creating the Performance Metrics worksheet…” -ForegroundColor Green
# Adding worksheet
$workbook.Worksheets.Add()
# Creating the “Virtual Machine” worksheet and naming it
$VirtualMachineWorksheet = $workbook.Worksheets.Item(1)
$VirtualMachineWorksheet.Name = ‘Virtual Machine perf metrics’
# Headers for the worksheet
$VirtualMachineWorksheet.Cells.Item(1,1) = ‘Resource Group Name’
$VirtualMachineWorksheet.Cells.Item(1,2) = ‘VM Name’
$VirtualMachineWorksheet.Cells.Item(1,3) = ‘Location’
$VirtualMachineWorksheet.Cells.Item(1,4) = ‘Percentage CPU’
$VirtualMachineWorksheet.Cells.Item(1,5) = ‘Units’
$VirtualMachineWorksheet.Cells.Item(1,6) = ‘Network IN’
$VirtualMachineWorksheet.Cells.Item(1,7) = ‘Units’
$VirtualMachineWorksheet.Cells.Item(1,8) = ‘Network Out’
$VirtualMachineWorksheet.Cells.Item(1,9) = ‘Units’
$VirtualMachineWorksheet.Cells.Item(1,10) = ‘Disk Read Bytes’
$VirtualMachineWorksheet.Cells.Item(1,11) = ‘Units’
$VirtualMachineWorksheet.Cells.Item(1,12) = ‘Disk Write Bytes’
$VirtualMachineWorksheet.Cells.Item(1,13) = ‘Units’
$VirtualMachineWorksheet.Cells.Item(1,14) = ‘Disk Read Operations/Sec’
$VirtualMachineWorksheet.Cells.Item(1,15) = ‘Units’
$VirtualMachineWorksheet.Cells.Item(1,16) = ‘Disk Write Operations/Sec’
$VirtualMachineWorksheet.Cells.Item(1,17) = ‘Units’
# Cell Counter
$row_counter = 3
$column_counter = 1
foreach($resourcegroup_list_iterator in $resourcegroup_list){
#write-output “RG: ” $resourcegroup_list_iterator
$vm_list = get-azurermvm -ResourceGroupName $resourcegroup_list_iterator
foreach($vm_list_iterator in $vm_list){
write-host “Fetching performance metrics for the virtual machine: ” $vm_list_iterator.Name -ForegroundColor cyan
$percentage_cpu_data = get-azurermmetric -ResourceId $vm_list_iterator.id -TimeGrain 00:01:00 -MetricName “Percentage CPU” # Percentage
$network_in_data = get-azurermmetric -ResourceId $vm_list_iterator.id -TimeGrain 00:01:00 -MetricName “Network IN” # Bytes
$network_out_data = get-azurermmetric -ResourceId $vm_list_iterator.id -TimeGrain 00:01:00 -MetricName “Network Out” # Bytes
$disk_read_bytes_data = get-azurermmetric -ResourceId $vm_list_iterator.id -TimeGrain 00:01:00 -MetricName “Disk Read Bytes” # Bytes Per Second
$disk_write_bytes_data = get-azurermmetric -ResourceId $vm_list_iterator.id -TimeGrain 00:01:00 -MetricName “Disk Write Bytes” # Bytes Per Second
$disk_read_operations_data = get-azurermmetric -ResourceId $vm_list_iterator.id -TimeGrain 00:01:00 -MetricName “Disk Read Operations/Sec” # Count Per Second
$disk_write_operations_data = get-azurermmetric -ResourceId $vm_list_iterator.id -TimeGrain 00:01:00 -MetricName “Disk Write Operations/Sec” # Count Per Second
$VirtualMachineWorksheet.Cells.Item($row_counter,$column_counter++) = $vm_list_iterator.ResourceGroupName.ToString()
$VirtualMachineWorksheet.Cells.Item($row_counter,$column_counter++) = $vm_list_iterator.Name.ToString()
$VirtualMachineWorksheet.Cells.Item($row_counter,$column_counter++) = $vm_list_iterator.Location.ToString()
$VirtualMachineWorksheet.Cells.Item($row_counter,$column_counter++) = $percentage_cpu_data.Data[-2].Average
$VirtualMachineWorksheet.Cells.Item($row_counter,$column_counter++) = “Percentage”
$VirtualMachineWorksheet.Cells.Item($row_counter,$column_counter++) = $network_in_data.Data[-2].Total
$VirtualMachineWorksheet.Cells.Item($row_counter,$column_counter++) = “Bytes”
$VirtualMachineWorksheet.Cells.Item($row_counter,$column_counter++) = $network_out_data.Data[-2].Total
$VirtualMachineWorksheet.Cells.Item($row_counter,$column_counter++) = “Bytes”
$VirtualMachineWorksheet.Cells.Item($row_counter,$column_counter++) = $disk_read_bytes_data.Data[-2].Average
$VirtualMachineWorksheet.Cells.Item($row_counter,$column_counter++) = “Bytes Per Second”
$VirtualMachineWorksheet.Cells.Item($row_counter,$column_counter++) = $disk_write_bytes_data.Data[-2].Average
$VirtualMachineWorksheet.Cells.Item($row_counter,$column_counter++) = “Bytes Per Second”
$VirtualMachineWorksheet.Cells.Item($row_counter,$column_counter++) = $disk_read_operations_data.Data[-2].Average
$VirtualMachineWorksheet.Cells.Item($row_counter,$column_counter++) = “Count Per Second”
$VirtualMachineWorksheet.Cells.Item($row_counter,$column_counter++) = $disk_write_operations_data.Data[-2].Average
$VirtualMachineWorksheet.Cells.Item($row_counter,$column_counter++) = “Count Per Second”
$row_counter = $row_counter + 1
$column_counter = 1
}
Write-Output ” ”
}
# Checking if the Inventory.xlsx already exists
if(Test-Path C:\AzurePerformanceMetrics\Performance_metrics.xlsx){
Write-Host “C:\AzurePerformanceMetrics\Performance_metrics.xlsx already exitst. Deleting the current file and creating a new one. `n” -ForegroundColor Yellow
Remove-Item C:\AzurePerformanceMetrics\Performance_metrics.xlsx
# Saving the workbook/excel file
$workbook.SaveAs(“C:\AzurePerformanceMetrics\Performance_metrics.xlsx”)
}else {
# Saving the workbook/excel file
$workbook.SaveAs(“C:\AzurePerformanceMetrics\Performance_metrics.xlsx”)
}
$excel.Quit()

 

Click here to download my PowerShell scripts for Free !!

 

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Azure – Server Inventory solution

This blog post is dedicated to IT Operations team and administrators who are managing Cloud Infrastructure. The recommended practice while providing managed service to any client is to have a CMDB (Configuration Management Database), which tracks the list of servers and the corresponding details, that we are managing for the client.

However, considering the dynamic nature of the cloud environment, it is a difficult task to maintain such a database. Manually updating the list of servers/server inventory is tedious and error-prone. The only solution is to have an automated approach to this problem.

Below is my solution:

The PowerShell script will extract virtual machines and their details. In this particular case, the script will consider virtual machines, which has tags (‘owner’,’Manju’). That is, I want to manage virtual machines owned only by me. You can go ahead and make changes to the script if you have a different requirement.

Next, the script will write the data into an Azure table. Remember, that the Azure table has to be created before running the script. Another option is Azure Cosmos DB.

Next, you can upload this script to your Azure Automation account or a dedicated windows server. Then, schedule this script to run every one hour to track your server inventory.

The script uses cmdlets from the “AzureRmStorageTable” PowerShell module.

Execute “Install-Module AzureRmStorageTable” to install the module.

Note: You have to alter the script when you schedule the script. The login mechanism is different for “Azure Automation” and “Task scheduler via Windows server”. The login mechanism of the below script is to execute it directly (manually) from PowerShell console or PowerShell ISE.

 

Script:

# Author: Manjunath Rao
# Date: Febuary 13, 2018

# Install-Module AzureRmStorageTable –>> THIS MODULE NEEDED

# Login to Azure
Login-AzureRmAccount
## Code to create Azure table storage context
$azure_table_storage_account_name = “xxx”
$azure_table_name = “xxx”
$azure_table_partitionKey = “xxx”
$azure_table_rowkey = “xxx”

$azure_table_resource_group = “xxx”

$storage_account_context = (Get-AzureRmStorageAccount -ResourceGroupName $azure_table_resource_group -Name $azure_table_storage_account_name).Context

$azure_table_object = Get-AzureStorageTable -Name $azure_table_name -Context $storage_account_context

############################################

# Getting all the resource group
$resource_group_list = Get-AzureRmResourceGroup

# Iterating through the resource group
foreach($resource_group_list_iterator in $resource_group_list){

# Since the solution applies for virtual machines,
# obtain the list of virtual machines for the resource group
$virtual_machine_list = get-azurermvm -ResourceGroupName $resource_group_list_iterator.ResourceGroupName

# Proceed only when resource group contains virtual machines
if(!($virtual_machine_list -eq $null)){

# Iterate through the virtual machine list
foreach($virtual_machine_list_iterator in $virtual_machine_list){

# Creat an unique ID by concatinating ‘Resource Group name’ and ‘Virtual Machine name’
$unique_id = $resource_group_list_iterator.ResourceGroupName + $virtual_machine_list_iterator.name
#Write-Host $unique_id
$tag_list = $virtual_machine_list_iterator.Tags

$tag_list.GetEnumerator() | foreach {
#write-host $_.key
#Write-Host $_.value
#write-host “”

$partitionKey1 = $unique_id

if($_.key -eq ‘owner’ -and $_.value -eq ‘manju’) {
#write-host “true”
$virtual_machine_name = $virtual_machine_list_iterator.Name.ToString()
$virtual_machine_resource_group_name = $resource_group_list_iterator.ResourceGroupName.ToString()
$virtual_machine_location = $virtual_machine_list_iterator.Location.ToString()
$virtual_machine_size = $virtual_machine_list_iterator.HardwareProfile.VmSize.ToString()
$virtual_machine_operating_system = $virtual_machine_list_iterator.StorageProfile.ImageReference.Offer.ToString()

 

$hash = @{}
#$hash.add(‘currentDate’, $current_date)
$hash.Add(‘VMName’,$virtual_machine_resource_group_name)
$hash.Add(‘ResourceGroup’,$virtual_machine_resource_group_name)
$hash.add(‘Location’,$virtual_machine_location)
$hash.add(‘VMSize’,$virtual_machine_size)
$hash.add(‘OperatingSystem’,$virtual_machine_operating_system)

# Write data into azure table
Add-StorageTableRow -table $azure_table_object -partitionKey (“CA1”) -rowKey ([guid]::NewGuid().tostring()) -property $hash

}
}

}

}

}

 

On the other hand, if you would like to fetch inventory details, and just save it in an excel sheet, I have the perfect scripts that do the job for you:

https://manjunathrao.com/2017/12/04/powershell-generte-azure-paas-inventory/

https://manjunathrao.com/2016/12/30/powershell-generate-azure-inventory/

https://manjunathrao.com/2017/04/06/powershell-generate-aws-inventory/

 

Click here to download my PowerShell scripts for Free !!

 

 

 

Powershell – Extract user list from Azure Active Directory to an excel file

This script will authenticate to your Azure Active Directory and fetch all the user details. Finally, it will save the details to the excel sheet.

Below is the link to the script:

https://gallery.technet.microsoft.com/scriptcenter/Extract-user-list-from-6cb9a93c

Below are the user attributes the script fetches:

1. Display Name

2. Object ID

3. Type

4. Principal Name

5. Role Name

6. Role Description

The excel sheet is saved as: C:\AzureADUserList\AzureADUserList.xlsx

Pre-Requisites: This script needs ‘MSOnline’ and ‘AzureRM’ PowerShell modules

Click here to download my PowerShell scripts for Free !!

 

 

PowerShell – Generate Azure PaaS Inventory

This PowerShell script helps you to maintain an inventory sheet of your Azure Platform-As-A-Service services. So that you can refer to them anytime you want.

Also, it serves a quick way to generate a report when your client needs to have a quick look at their PaaS services.

Below is the flow

  • The script logins to your Azure account and fetches the details of your Azure PaaS resources – Azure CDN and Azure WebApps.
  • It creates one worksheet for each Azure resource.
  • The user is prompted to select the subscription.Powershell Exception handling is implemented.
  • The user is again prompted if he wishes to view the excel sheet once the script is finished running.

** The script assumes you are using Powershell v5.0 and have excel module. (Basically, you should have MSOffice installed)

Below is the link to the script:

https://gallery.technet.microsoft.com/scriptcenter/Azure-PaaS-inventory-using-d1872989

I have also written script to generate:

Azure IaaS Inventory

AWS IaaS Inventory

Click here to download my PowerShell scripts for Free !!

 

 

PowerShell – List Azure Backup Items

Azure Backup is the Azure-based service you can use to back up (or protect) and restore your data in the Microsoft cloud. Azure Backup replaces your existing on-premises or off-site backup solution with a cloud-based solution that is reliable, secure, and cost-competitive.

Azure Backup offers multiple components that you download and deploy on the appropriate computer, server, or in the cloud. The component, or agent that you deploy depends on what you want to protect.

All Azure Backup components (no matter whether you’re protecting data on-premises or in the cloud) can be used to back up data to a Recovery Services vault in Azure.

You might come across a need to automate the process of generating a report every day and share it with stakeholders to keep track of your backup details.

The PowerShell script will list the “Backup Items” from your Azure subscription. And saves the data into an excel file under the folder  “C:\Backup_job_report.” The excel file will contain multiple worksheets for each “Vault” that exists. The script expects you to provide a text file containing the list of Azure Servers, for which you want to fetch the “Backup Items.”

The details include:

1. VM Resource Name

2. VM Name

3. Recovery Vault Name

4. Last Backup Status

5. Latest Recovery Point

The script is uploaded to Microsoft Technet Script Center’s repository:

List Azure Backup Items using Powershell

You can obtain this information from the Azure portal. Please traverse as shown below:

Sign in to Azure Portal >> Search and select “Recovery Services vaults” >> Select a vault >> Click on “Backup Items” under protected items >> Click on “Azure Virtual Machines”.

 

Azure

 

Click here to download my PowerShell scripts for Free !!

 

 

Azure – First look into Cloudlyn (Azure’s Cost management service)

This is a continuation of my first blog on Cloudlyn. Below is the link to my first blog. It guides you to register for Cloudlyn if you have an Azure subscription.

AZURE – COST MANAGEMENT BETTER THAN EVER USING CLOUDYN (REGISTRATION)

In this post, let us take a first-look into Cloudlyn’s Cost management console and the features Cloudlyn offers.

Once you have completed the registration with Cloudlyn as explained in my first blog (link shared above). You can access the Cloudlyn’s Cost management portal by:

  1. Log into Azure portal
  2. Navigate to “Cost Management + Billing.”
  3. Click on “Go to Cost Management” button
  4. A new window will be opened with an URL – https://azure.cloudyn.com/dashboard#/tool/enterprise_dashboard

Once you navigate to the URL, below is the page you see. This is Cloudlyn’s Management Dashboard.

image_7

 

Below is the Annual Projected Annual cost. I have used only Azure Storage and Azure Network. If you have used more services, their costs will also be projected here.

image_8

 

We can also view Current and Previous Month Projected Cost. This is very useful to track changes in infrastructure costing more than usual.

image_9

 

The “Actual Cost Analysis” will provide cost by Services, Providers, and Accounts. This graph can be further customized. Groups (highlighted below) provides plenty of options that we can check as per our requirement. Finally, you can choose an option from many of the Actions (highlighted below) on what to do with the report. Save / Copy  / Export etc.,

image_10

 

The “Actual Cost Over Time” lets you pull up a report to analyze the cost over a range of time.

image_11

 

Cloudlyn also offers an “Alert Management” feature that alerts you when certain thresholds are crossed as per alert’s configuration.

image_13

 

“Cost vs. Threshold” is one of many alerts. As you can see Cloudlyn offers you many options to customize the alert policy. Alerts will be sent to an email ID.

image_12

 

Finally, the last noticeable feature is “Data Transfer.” You can either Analyze data transfer usage or view the trend of data transfer.

image_14

 

These are the noticeable features that I felt to be very valuable.

If you found any other feature to be worth mentioning, let me know in the comments section.

If the content of this blog is valuable to you, do consider sharing with your friends and colleagues.

Click here to download my PowerShell scripts for Free !!

Azure – Cost Management Better Than Ever Using Cloudyn (Registration)

Microsoft’s acquisition of Cloudyn will help Azure customers manage and optimize their cloud usage. Read more about the acquisition here. A message from Sharon Wagner, CEO of Cloudyn.

About Cloudyn

Azure Cost Management by Cloudyn empowers organizations to monitor cloud spend, drive organizational accountability, and optimize cloud efficiency so they can accelerate future cloud investments with confidence.

Microsoft’s acquisition of Cloudyn will help Azure customers and partners as they face the challenges of growing their multi-cloud environments. It will enable them to gain visibility, understand and optimize cloud consumption, as well as accurately project future usage.

Microsoft will continue to support multi-cloud environments, including Azure, AWS, and GCP. Azure Cost Management by Cloudyn is available for free to customers and partners managing Azure spend. Additional premium capabilities are available at no cost through June 2018, once they will become paid features.

Let us look into how to sign up to Cloudyn if you are an Azure customer

Step 1: Login to your Azure Subscription via the Azure portal. Select the “Cost Management + Billing” blade. Then select “Cost Management” from the options on the left-hand side of the pane.

Click on “Go to Cost Management”

image_1

 

Step 2: Once you click the”Go to Cost Management” button, you will be redirected to  Cloudlyn’s page to set up your Cost Management details.

Enter your organization name and the type of Azure access you have on your Azure account. I have a personal subscription, so I have chosen as “Azure Individual Subscription Owner.”

image_2

 

Step 3: Cloudlyn Account name and Tenant ID will be automatically populated. Now, select the offer-ID from the drop-down list.

If you do not know your Offer-ID, then go back to your Azure portal. Click on “Subscriptions,” that should provide you the type of subscription that you have.

image3_1

 

Step 4: Click “Next”

image_4

 

Step 5: Click “Next”

image_5

Step 6: We are done with the registration with Cloudlyn. Cloudlyn needs about 2 hours for collecting the data.

image_6

 

If you find the content valuable, do consider sharing with your friends and colleagues.

Click here to download my PowerShell scripts for Free !!